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Gendered Landscapes in Historic Deerfield

  • Deborah Rotman
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Global Historical Archaeology book series (CGHA)

Abstract

Cultural landscapes are dynamic social spaces. In this chapter, I define cultural landscapes and provide comparative examples of landscape studies. Since individual homelots are the foci of this study, domestic spaces and residential architecture are a particular emphasis. I theoretically contextualize the macrolevel analyses of the villagescape.

Landscape study remains a relatively new focus of anthropological research, a development that has brought the discipline, and notably historical archaeology, into intersection with other disciplines interested in space and spatial relationships. There were a number of concurrent themes in the literature of cultural landscapes that were particularly useful in this research in Deerfield village. Notably, landscapes are material, complex, and meaningful. Furthermore, they represent unique as well as collective experiences. I explore these themes in the following section and conclude by challenging the scalar aspect of landscape as it is currently studied and understood (see also Rotman 2003; Rotman and Savulis 2003).

Keywords

Social Relation Cultural Landscape Historical Archaeology Gender Ideology Architectural Style 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah Rotman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of Notre DameNotre DameUSA

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