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The Village, Families, and Archaeological Assemblages in this Study

  • Deborah Rotman
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Global Historical Archaeology book series (CGHA)

Abstract

Beginning in the mid-eighteenth century, residents of Deerfield, MA experienced the social, economic, and political transformations that emerged with the new republic. The nineteenth and twentieth centuries were also eras of change, marked by the effects of intensified agricultural production and industrialization, with eventual economic decline as industry bypassed the village, and canals and railroads opened the vast agricultural regions to the west (Fig. 3.1). The ways in which the men and women in this rural village responded to and were influenced by these changes were expressed in their social and material worlds (e.g., Blades 1976, 1977; Bograd 1989; Folbre 1985; Garrison 1991; Glazier 1987; Harlow 2001; Hautaniemi 2001; Hautaniemi and Rotman 2003; Hautaniemi 2001; McGowan and Miller 1996; Miller and Lanning 1994; Paynter 2002; Paynter et al. 1987; Rotman 2001, 2005, 2006). In this chapter, I summarize the history of the village, introduce the families included in this study, and summarize the archaeological assemblages analyzed to understand gendered social relations in the community.

Keywords

Eighteenth Century Material Culture Gender Relation Gender Ideology Archaeological Context 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah Rotman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of Notre DameNotre DameUSA

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