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Theoretical Framework for Understanding Gender Roles and Relations

  • Deborah Rotman
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Global Historical Archaeology book series (CGHA)

Abstract

Gendered social relations were inextricably linked to class, ethnicity, race, sexuality, and identity, among innumerable other social, cultural, economic, and political forces that both shaped and were shaped by the lived experiences of residents in Deerfield and throughout the United States. In addition, how individuals and families understood, interpreted, and operationalized gender ideologies was vastly influenced by the rural or urban or suburban context in which they lived as well as the changes and transformations that were part of the natural life course from a child to an adult to a young parent to an elderly individual.

In this section, I summarize the scholarly literature that has informed my investigation of gendered social relations in Deerfield. This literature review should not be interpreted as a comprehensive appraisal of all the gender research available, since such a précis of this dynamic research arena would require a multivolume set. Rather, in this chapter, I seek to contextualize my research within the theoretical and multidisciplinary framework that has most significantly influenced this project.

Keywords

Gender Role Ethnic Identity Gender Relation Historical Archaeologist Gender Ideology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah Rotman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of Notre DameNotre DameUSA

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