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Improving Personal Relations for Multi-cultural People

  • Mary Sengstock
Chapter
Part of the Clinical Sociology: Research and Practice book series (CSRP)

At this point, it is perhaps important to review the original purpose of this study. As we noted at several points, previous studies of multi-culturalism have essentially examined multi-culturalism at the meso- or the macro-levels. That is, they have focused on the several different cultural and racial groups which make up a multi-cultural society. As a result of these efforts, we have numerous works which examine the characteristics of the many groups which have entered into the USA over the course of its history, and which comprise American society as it exists today. Chapter 1 provided a summary of some of the studies of these varying immigrant groups, from early colonial days through the mid-20th century.

Keywords

Racial Difference Cultural Background Cultural Group Religious Tradition Negative Comment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Wayne State UniversityDetroitUSA

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