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American Multi-culturalism in the 21st Century

  • Mary Sengstock
Chapter
Part of the Clinical Sociology: Research and Practice book series (CSRP)

Whether the dominant American population likes it or not, the nation has become more multi-cultural as a result of movements that occurred in the last three decades of the 20th century. Largely, this was a result of the Immigration Act of 1965, which restructured the quota system of immigration which existed since the 1920s (Alba and Nee, 2003: 8, 174). As noted in Chapter 1, the 1920s immigration laws established a pattern in which the majority of legal immigrants admitted to the USA would be from the same Western European nations who came prior to the great waves of migration in the early 20th century. It was deliberately designed to exclude immigrants who were “different” from the White Protestant mainstream, and to make it easier for newcomers to become part of the dominant society.

Keywords

Affirmative Action Illegal Immigrant Cultural Perspective Cultural Pattern Mixed Race 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Wayne State UniversityDetroitUSA

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