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Biomechanics and Pathophysiology of Concussion

  • Michael McCrea
  • Mathew R. Powell
Chapter

Abstract

Major progress in the basic and clinical science of concussion has been realized over the past decade. Innovative new paradigms for brain injury research have advanced our scientific understanding of the biomechanics, true natural history of clinical recovery, and window of cerebral vulnerability associated with concussion. Modern technologies have provided a translational bridge from animal brain injury models to direct study of the characteristics and pathophysiology of concussion in humans. In the overwhelming majority of cases, clinical recovery occurs over a period of several days to weeks after concussion, without persistent symptoms or functional impairments. Young, developing brains may be at heightened risk of serious or catastrophic outcomes following concussion, which are extremely rare. The collective body of research in recent years ultimately provides a more evidence-driven approach to clinical management of concussion in all settings.

Keywords

Fractional Anisotropy Diffusion Tensor Imaging Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Head Acceleration Fluid Percussion Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Departments of Neurosurgery and NeurologyMedical College of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA
  2. 2.Neuropsychology DepartmentMinocqua Behavioral Health, Marshfield ClinicMinocquaUSA

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