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Evaluative Models of Discrete Part Production Lines

  • Chrissoleon T. Papadopoulos
  • Michael J. Vidalis
  • Michael E. J. O’Kelly
  • Diomidis Spinellis
Chapter
Part of the Springer Optimization and Its Applications book series (SOIA, volume 31)

Abstract

The focus here is on discrete part production lines with asynchronous movement where each part produced is distinct. Production lines processing fluids and other continuous materials are not considered. From here on, when reference is made to production lines, discrete part production lines will be understood. In a production or flow line, all jobs are required to pass through each station in the same sequence once. These lines are usually associated with scale rather than scope, and a major advantage of production lines is the associated simple materials handling requirements.

A production line consists of work-stations, materials, human resources, and inter-work-station storage facilities. Storage facilities have a finite capacity. Randomness is introduced due to random processing times and the random behavior of work-stations in relation to failure and repair. In terms of classical queueing theory, production lines would be described as finite buffer tandem queueing systems where the work-stations are the servers, storage facilities are the buffers or the waiting lines, and the jobs are the customers.

Keywords

Production Line Service Time Service Rate Parallel Machine Decomposition Algorithm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chrissoleon T. Papadopoulos
    • 1
  • Michael J. Vidalis
    • 2
  • Michael E. J. O’Kelly
    • 3
  • Diomidis Spinellis
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  2. 2.Department of Business AdministrationUniversity of the AegeanChiosGreece
  3. 3.Department of Industrial EngineeringNational University of Ireland University College GalwayGalwayIreland
  4. 4.Department of Management ScienceUniversity of Economics & BusinessAthensGreece

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