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Character Problems: Justifications of Character Education Programs, Compulsory Schooling, and Gifted Education

  • Barry Grant
Chapter

Abstract

Proponents of character education (CE) efforts neglect an essential aspect of any CE program: justifications of their implementation in compulsory public schools. This chapter defends two claims: Justifications for CE programs should, but do not, demonstrate consistency between the moral values stated or implied in the justification and the moral values taught and embodied in the program should, but do not, address the compulsory nature of public schooling. The chapter argues that the only justifiable form of CE in public schools is one that teaches compliance with the values and beliefs of the adults with the power to define the content of public schools. Educators of the gifted ought to be especially concerned about the soundness of justifications for CE programs. Gifted students are special targets of CE interventions and may be especially vulnerable to ill-conceived CE interventions. The chapter concludes with a call for gifted educators interested in CE to think beyond compulsory schooling.

Keywords

Public School Character Education Moral Education Compulsory Schooling Moral Truth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Director Sussex SchoolMissoulaUSA

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