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Transnationalization and Its Governance – Actorhood and Power in the Shadow of Global Crisis

  • Marie-Laure Djelic
Chapter

The transnationalization of our world has multiple dimensions. Transnationalization has arguably quite an impact on many aspects of our everyday life. Many of the goods we consume have been produced through a transnational chain – think of a bag made up of high-quality Italian leather, designed in France and stitched and produced in China. The different goods or services we buy are increasingly defined and standardized, if not homogenized, through systems of rules or norms with a transnational scope. What a European consumer gets when she buys chocolate in her local store has been defined and standardized by the European Commission. Companies around the world are going through multiple certification processes and are bound to various categories of standards – efficiency, quality, ethical or environmental ones. Many of those standards have a transnational imprint and scope.

Keywords

Corporate Social Responsibility Forest Stewardship Council Governance Process Sovereign Wealth Fund Mover Advantage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marie-Laure Djelic
    • 1
  1. 1.ESSEC Business School, Cergy-Pontoise CedexCergy-PontoiseFrance

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