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National and European? Protesting the Lisbon Agenda and the Services Directive in the European Union

  • Louisa Parks
Chapter

The process of Europeanization, that is the growing importance of the European Union (EU) as a locus of political decision-making, affects its member states in an increasing number of policy areas and constitutes an important challenge for both institutional and noninstitutional political actors at both the national and European levels. Social movements, on the other hand, developed in the context of the nation state. Yet with the rise of transnational centers of power, movements too have become more transnational, directing their claims to organizations such as the WTO, the G8 and the EU.

Keywords

European Union Social Movement European Council Political Opportunity European Union Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.European University InstituteFlorenceItaly

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