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Introduction to Child Clinical Neuropsychology

  • Margaret Semrud-Clikeman
  • Phyllis Anne Teeter Ellison

Abstract

Child neuropsychology is the study of brain function and behavior in children and adolescents. Brain functioning has a direct impact on the behavioral, cognitive, and psychosocial adjustment of children and adolescents. Thus, disorders must be addressed within an integrated model of child clinical neuropsychology. Further, the development of the central nervous system (CNS) and the neurodevelopmental course of childhood disorders are of importance within an integrated framework. Studies routinely have identified the importance of intact functional cortical and subcortical systems in the overall adjustment of children and adolescents. Further, researchers have recently begun to address specific strategies for treating various brain-related disorders. Initial results suggest reason to be optimistic when interventions consider the child's functional neuro-psychological status.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Tourette Syndrome Learn Disability Severe Brain Injury Transactional Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret Semrud-Clikeman
    • 1
  • Phyllis Anne Teeter Ellison
    • 2
  1. 1.Michigan State UniversityLansingUSA
  2. 2.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA

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