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Biological Gel-Glasses

  • L. L. Hench
  • E. Fielder

Abstract

Bioactive gel-glasses composed of CaO-P2O5-SiO2 are used to repair bone defects and have potential applications in tissue engineering. A bioactive material elicits a specific biological response at the interface of the material which results in the formation of a mechanically strong bond between the tissues and the material [1]. There are two classes of bioactivity, which depend upon the rate and type of tissue response to the implant. Class A bioactive materials exhibit rapid bonding to bone, bone growth along the implant interface, termed osteoconduction, enhanced rates of bone proliferation, termed osteoproduction, and bonding to soft connective tissues. Class B bioactive materials exhibit slow rates of bone bonding and bone growth and no adherence to soft connective tissues. Bioactive geglasses have Class A bioactivity. An important advantage of bioactive gelglasses is that their rate of resorption and dissolution can be controlled during bone repair or tissue engineering by varying either composition or texture.

Keywords

Tissue Engineering Bone Growth Bioactive Glass Bioactive Material Bone Bonding 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. L. Hench
  • E. Fielder

There are no affiliations available

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