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Research on PCIT

  • Cheryl Bodiford McNeil
  • Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
Chapter
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

Establishing an evidence-based treatment often involves single-subject studies, program evaluations, and randomized controlled trials. However, after research demonstrates the efficacy of a particular treatment through these methods, there are many additional areas to investigate before the intervention is disseminated and widely employed. PCIT, like other evidence-based interventions, has been developed in a similar way, beginning with early research demonstrating changes in disruptive behavior at post-treatment in comparison to waitlist children (e.g., McNeil, Capage, Bahl, & Blanc, 1999; Schuhmann, Foote, Eyberg, Boggs, & Algina, 1998).

Keywords

Intimate Partner Violence Oppositional Defiant Disorder Disruptive Behavior Parent Training Foster Parent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cheryl Bodiford McNeil
    • 1
  • Toni L. Hembree-Kigin
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWest Virginia UniversityMorgantownUSA
  2. 2.Early Childhood Mental Health ServicesMesaUSA

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