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Farm Labor and the Struggle for Justice in the Eastern United States

  • Thomas A. Arcury
  • Antonio J. Marín
Chapter

Abstract

Farm work has historically been performed by people of color who suffer widespread labor abuses and lack the power to make systemic change in the agricultural system. This continues today. Farmworkers are consistently treated as different from other employees, and are governed by different labor standards. There has been little to no effort to include farmworkers in the major labor laws, partly because of the difficulties organizing a primarily migrant, undocumented and disenfranchised farmworker population and partly due to the strong opposition by agricultural employers. This chapter focuses on the general strategies, which farmworker groups in the eastern US use to advocate for justice for farmworkers including organizing, advocacy, and service. It highlights national and state organizations that are involved with advocacy, paying particular attention to the role of research in working for farmworker justice.

Keywords

Leadership Development Farm Labor Agricultural Employer Undocumented Worker Legislative Advocacy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas A. Arcury
    • 1
  • Antonio J. Marín
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Family and Community MedicineWake Forest University School of MedicineUSA
  2. 2.Research Associate in the Department of Family and Community MedicineWake Forest University School of Medicine USA

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