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Life Course

  • Heather Hofmeister
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter will describe the life course as a perspective on the way human beings live across time and place, and in particular how life course researchers study the ways time and place shape individuals and the ways individuals also shape their times and places. A diverse and changing Europe situated within an ever-more connected world makes this perspective supremely valuable. In this chapter I first describe the life course as an orienting strategy for social science research, next lay out its primary concepts and relationships, and then finally give examples of research and findings that use a life course perspective to help explain contemporary European lives.

Keywords

Labor Market Human Agency Role Transition National Context Iron Curtain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author would like to thank Julia Hahmann for important research contributions to this chapter.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Sociology with the specialty Gender StudiesRWTH Aachen UniversityAachenGermany

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