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Inflammatory Bowel Disease

  • Carin Cunningham
  • Rachel Neff Greenley
Chapter

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing condition of inflammation of the digestive tract, characterized by periods of active disease alternating with periods of disease remission. IBD is diagnosed in adolescence at a rate of 25–30% (Cuffari & Darbari, 2002) and uniquely impacts the typical biological, psychological, social, and cognitive changes of adolescence, as well as the process of autonomy development.

Keywords

Inflammatory Bowel Disease Ulcerative Colitis Irritable Bowel Syndrome Family Functioning Chronic Medical Condition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Websites and Resources for Families and Patients

  1. Crohn & Colitis Foundation of America, 386 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10016-8804, (800) 826-0826. www.ccfa.org
  2. North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, PO Box 6, Flourtown, PA 19031, (215) 233–0808. www.naspgn.org
  3. The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation’s Information Resource Center, 1-888.MY.GUT.PAIN phone line with professionals who can answer questions Monday to Friday 9am–5 pm EST.Google Scholar
  4. This is a free online community where patients and family members can participate in discussion boards and receive support. www.ccfacommunity.org
  5. This is a website for children and adolescents where they can share, stories, tips and chat. www.UCandCrohns.org
  6. United Ostomy Association, Inc., 19772 MacArthur Boulevard, Suite 200, Irvine, CA 92612-2405. www.uoa.org

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Case Western Reserve School of MedicineClevelandUSA

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