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Impact of Reactive Oxygen Species on the Expression of Adhesion Molecules in Vivo

  • Oliver Thews
  • Christine Lambert
  • Debra K. Kelleher
  • Hans K. Biesalski
  • Peter Vaupel
  • Juergen Frank
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 645)

Abstract

Many non-surgical tumor treatments induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) which result in cell damage. This study investigated the impact of ROS induction on the expression of adhesion molecules and whether α-tocopherol pre-treatment could have a protective effect. Experimental rat DS-sarcomas were treated with a combination of localized 44°C-hyperthermia, inspiratory hyperoxia and xanthine oxidase which together lead to a pronounced ROS induction. Further animals were pre-treated with α-tocopherol. The in vivoexpression of E- and N-cadherin, α-catenin, integrins αv, β3 and β5 as well as of the integrin dimer αvβ3 was assessed by flow cytometry. The expression of αv-, β3-integrin, of the αvβ3-integrin dimer and of E-cadherin was significantly reduced by the ROS-inducing treatment. This effect was partially reversible by α-tocopherol, indicating that ROS play a role in this process. N-cadherin, α-catenin and β5-integrin expression were unaffected by ROS. These results indicate that the expression of several adhesion molecules is markedly reduced by ROS and may result in a decrease in the structural stability of tumor tissue. Further studies are needed to clarify the impact of ROS induction on the metastatic behavior of tumors.

Keywords

Xanthine Oxidase Circulate Tumor Cell Adhesion Molecule Expression Metastatic Behavior Outer Cell Membrane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Oliver Thews
    • 1
  • Christine Lambert
    • 2
  • Debra K. Kelleher
    • 1
  • Hans K. Biesalski
    • 2
  • Peter Vaupel
    • 1
  • Juergen Frank
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Physiology and PathophysiologyUniversity of MainzGermany
  2. 2.Institute of Biological Chemistry and NutritionUniversity of HohenheimGermany

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