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Liberation Movements During Democratic Transition: Positioning with the Changing State

  • Cristina Jayme Montiel
  • Agustin Martin G. Rodriguez
Chapter
Part of the Peace Psychology Book Series book series (PPBS)

Liberation Movements during Democratic Transition: Positioning with the Changing State

Liberation psychology emphasizes social psychological processes involved in dismantling social inequities and exclusion, giving voice to the politically and culturally silenced, and fusing theory with practice through conscientized praxis. One cannot speak of liberation without confronting power-related phenomena. For example, groups in the dominant structure tend to control legitimate arsenals and use these to silence social resistance. The liberation process necessitates the production, distribution, and utilization of social power. Hence, a psychology of liberation addresses that which is subjective among individuals and collectives engaged in public power.

One example of a liberation process involves the large-scale political process of toppling a dictatorship, and building more inclusive political systems. Admittedly, democratic transitions rarely produce marked restructurings in wealth...

Keywords

Social Movement Liberation Movement Political Power Social Democrat Democratic Transition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

The authors gratefully acknowledge the generous support received by the first author from Ateneo de Manila University’s Professorial Chair and Loyola Schools Scholarly Work Grant in 2007.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cristina Jayme Montiel
    • 1
  • Agustin Martin G. Rodriguez
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyAteneo de Manila UniversityPhilippines

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