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Liberating South African Psychology: The Legacy of Racism and the Pursuit of Representative Knowledge Production

  • Norman Duncan
  • Brett Bowman
Chapter
Part of the Peace Psychology Book Series book series (PPBS)

Introduction

South Africa’s first nonracial, democratic national elections in 1994 brought to a close the period of legislated racism that had rendered the South African state one of the most reviled of the twentieth century. However, despite these watershed elections and South Africa’s new constitution, which expressly proscribes any form of racism, South African society continues to be strongly characterized by the power of “race” and racism as determinants of social division, interaction and identity. This is manifested in a variety of ways, including ongoing residential segregation based on race, the persistent racialized patterns of friendship, the usage of public spaces, and the consistently negative portrayal of blacks (albeit increasingly covert) in the media (Dixon, Tredoux, & Clack, 2005; Duncan, 2003; Durrheim, 2005; Foster, 2005).

However, perhaps the most salient and debilitating manifestation of the enduring impact of racism in South Africa are the persistent racialized...

Keywords

Racial Difference Knowledge Production Institutionalize Racism South African Journal Racial Oppression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of the Witwatersrand, South Africa

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