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Quantitative Measurement in Family Research

  • Karen S. Wampler
  • Charles F. HalversonJr.

Abstract

In this chapter, a brief history of quantitative measurement is given followed by an overview of different types of measures. Next, the assumptions of quantitative measurements are assessed using the language of construct validity. Finally, the key questions that must be addressed in measurement as well as the limitations of quantitative measurement are considered.

Keywords

Family Functioning Family Therapy Marital Quality Family Interaction Observational Measure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen S. Wampler
    • 1
  • Charles F. HalversonJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Human Development and Family StudiesTexas Tech UniversityLubbock
  2. 2.Department of Child and Family DevelopmentUniversity of GeorgiaAthensGeorgia

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