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Qualitative Family Research

  • Paul C. Rosenblatt
  • Lucy Rose Fischer

Abstract

Qualitative family research requires in-depth and detailed information about family interactions and about the perceptions, understandings, and memories of family members. In qualitative family research, the persons being studied “speak” in words or through other symbols about family experiences and dynamics. There can be a special excitement that comes with the access to such privileged information and a heavy responsibility to present it respectfully in written reports.

Keywords

Qualitative Research Family Life Feminist Research Family System Theory Privileged Information 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul C. Rosenblatt
    • 1
  • Lucy Rose Fischer
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Family Social ScienceUniversity of MinnesotaSt. Paul
  2. 2.Wilder Research CenterSt. Paul

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