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Symbolic Interactionism and Family Studies

  • Ralph LaRossa
  • Donald C. Reitzes

Abstract

Symbolic interactionism occupies a unique and important position in family studies. The principal theoretical orientation of the 1920s and 1930s (when family studies was endeavoring to establish itself as a science) and one of the most popular family perspectives today, symbolic interactionism probably has had more of an impact on the study of families than almost any other theoretical perspective (Hays, 1977; Howard, 1981).

Keywords

Family Study American Sociological Review Emotional Socialization Symbolic Interactionism Identity Salience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph LaRossa
    • 1
  • Donald C. Reitzes
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyGeorgia State UniversityAtlanta

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