Advertisement

Historical Methods in Family Research

  • Jay D. Schvaneveldt
  • Robert S. Pickett
  • Margaret H. Young

Abstract

In answer to the question, “What is history,” Gallie (1968) stated that it is a wide collection of searches, resting upon evidence, that addresses past human endeavors. History is an account, a story, or a record of what has happened in the life of a people, a country, or a society. It is a branch of knowledge dealing with past events. In a sense, everything we do and say is a part of history. It may not have meaning to others and it may not be recorded for others to ponder, but nevertheless it is a part of the human story. History as a whole tells the story of human actors in a complex world of change, disruption, and continuity. As such, the domain of historical methods constitutes an appropriate context for understanding research findings on attitudes and behavior associated with family functioning.

Keywords

Family Life Family Study Family Violence Social History Historical Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adams, G., & Schvaneveldt, J. (1991). Obtaining data: Documents of the past. In G. Adams & J. Schvaneveldt, Understanding research methods (2nd ed., pp. 291–314). New York: Longman.Google Scholar
  2. Allen, K. (1989). Single women/family ties: Life histories of older women. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  3. Allen, K., & Pickett, R. (1984). Historical perspectives on the life course of elderly women born in 1910. Journal of Applied Gerontology, 3, 161–170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Allen, K., & Pickett, R. (1987). Forgotten streams in the family life course: Utilization of qualitative retrospective interviews in the analysis of lifelong single women’s family careers. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 49, 514–526.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Anderson, M. (1971). Family structure in nineteenth century Lancashire. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Anderson, M. (1977). Family and class in nineteenth-century cities. Journal of Family History, 2, 139–149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Aries, P. (1962). Centuries of childhood: A social history of family life (R. Baldick, Trans.). New York: Vintage.Google Scholar
  8. Bachofen, J. (1967). Myth, religion, and mother right: Selected writings (R. Manheim, Trans). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. (Original work published 1861)Google Scholar
  9. Bardis, P. (1964). Family forms and variations historically considered. In H. Christensen (Ed.), Handbook of marriage and the family (pp. 403–461). Chicago: Rand McNally.Google Scholar
  10. Barker, J. (1982). The superhistorians: Makers of our past. New York: Scribner’s.Google Scholar
  11. Baron, S. (1986). The contemporary relevance of history. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Barzun, J. (1974). Clio and the doctors: Psycho-history, quanto-history, and history. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  13. Barzun, J., & Graff, H. (1985). The modem researcher (4th ed.). New York: Harcourt Brace & Jovanovich.Google Scholar
  14. Beard, C. (1913). The economic interpretation of the constitution of the United States. New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  15. Beard, M. (1946). Women as force in history: A study in traditions and realities. New York: Collier Books.Google Scholar
  16. Berkner, L. (1975). The use and misuse of census data for the historical analysis of family structure. Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 5, 721–738.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Billington, R. (1975). Allan Nevins on history. New York: Scribner’s.Google Scholar
  18. Boocock, S. (1978). Historical and sociological research on the family and the life cycle: Methodological alternatives. In J. Demos & S. Boocock (Eds), Turning points: Historical and sociological essays on the family (pp. 366–394). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  19. Bridges, W. (1965). Family patterns and social values in America, 1825–1875. American Quarterly, 17, 3–11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Campbell, J. (1967). Introduction, J.J. Bachofen: Myth Religion, and Mother Right. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  21. Chambers-Schiller, L. (1984). Liberty, a better husband: Single women in America: The generations of 1780–1840. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Coontz, S. (1988). The social origins of private life: A history of American families. New York: Verso.Google Scholar
  23. Crosby, J. (Ed.)(1985). Reply to myth: Perspectives on intimacy. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  24. Darwin, C. (1859). On the origin of the species by means of natural selection. London: Murray.Google Scholar
  25. Degler, C. (1980). Women and the family. In M. Kammen (Ed.), The past before us: Contemporary historical writing in the United States (pp. 308–326). Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  26. de Mause, L. (1974). The evolution of childhood. In L. de Mause (Ed.), The history of childhood (pp. 1–73). New York: Psychohistory Press.Google Scholar
  27. Demos, J. (1970). A little commonwealth: Family life in Plymouth Colony. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  28. Demos, J. (1986). Past, present, and personal: The family and the life course in American history. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  29. Elder, G. (1978). Approaches to social change and the family. In J. Demos & S. Boocock (Eds.), Turning points: Historical and sociological essays on the family (pp. 1–38). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  30. Elder, G. (1981). History and the family: The discovery of complexity. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 43, 489–514.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Engels, F. (1942). The origin of the family, private property, and the state. New York: International. (Original work published 1891)Google Scholar
  32. Featherman, D., & Lerner, R. (1985). Ontogenesis and sociogenesis: Problematics for theory and research about development and socialization across the lifespan. American Sociological Review, 50, 659–676.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Fitch, N. (1988). The crisis in history: Its pedagogical implications. Historical Methods, 24, 104–111.Google Scholar
  34. Flexner, E. (1959). Century of struggle. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  35. Fogel, R. (1983). “Scientific” history and traditional history. In R. Fogel & G. Elton (Eds), Which road to the past? Two views of history. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  36. Forster, R. & Ranum O. (Eds. and Trans.) (1975). Biology of man in history: Selections from the Annales. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  37. Foss, D. (1963). The world view of Talcott Parsons. In M. Stein & A. Vidich (Eds.), Sociology on trial (pp. 96–126). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  38. Franzoni, R. (1987). The press as a source of socio-historical data. Issues in the methodology of data collection from newspapers. Historical Methods, 21(1), 5–16.Google Scholar
  39. Gaffield, C., & Baskerville, P. (1985). The automated archivist: Interdisciplinarity and the process of historical research. Social Science History, 9, 167–184.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Gallie, W. (1968). Philosophy and the historical understanding (2nd ed.). New York: Shocken Books.Google Scholar
  41. Glick, P. (1964). Demographic analysis of family data. In H. Christensen (Ed.), Handbook of marriage and the family (pp. 300–344). Chicago: Rand McNally.Google Scholar
  42. Glick, P. (1988). Fifty years of family demography: A record of social change. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 50, 861–873.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Goldin, C. (1990). Understanding the gender gap: An economic history of American women. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  44. Goode, W. (1963). World revolution and family patterns. London: Free Press of Glencoe.Google Scholar
  45. Gordon, L. (1988). Heroes of their own lives: The politics and history of family violence, Boston, 1880–1960. New York: Penguin.Google Scholar
  46. Gordon, M. (1978). The American family: Past, present and future. New York: Random House.Google Scholar
  47. Green, J. (1961). The death of Adam. New York: Mentor.Google Scholar
  48. Hareven, T. (1976). Modernization and family history: Perspectives on social change. Signs, 2, 190–206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Hareven, T. (1987). Historical analysis of the family. In M. B. Sussman & S. K. Steinmetz (Eds.), Handbook of marriage and the family (chap. 2). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
  50. Hareven, T. (1987). Family history at the crossroads. Journal of Family History, 12, ix–xxiii.Google Scholar
  51. Hareven, T., & Mesaoka, K. (1988). Turning points and transitions: Perceptions of the life course. Journal of Family History, 13, 271–289.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Harrington, M. (1962). The other America: Poverty in the United States. New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  53. Hegel, G. (1929). Hegel’s logic of world and idea (H. Macran, Trans.). Oxford: Clarendon.Google Scholar
  54. Henry, L. (1976). Population: Analysis and models. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  55. Hershberg, T. (Ed.) (1981). Philadelphia: Work, space, family, and group experience in the nineteenth century: Essays towards an interdisciplinary history of the city. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  56. Hill, R., & Hansen, D. (1960). The identification of conceptual frameworks utilized in family study. Marriage and Family Living, 22, 299–311.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Hill, R., & Rodgers, R. H. (1964). The developmental approach. In H. Christensen (Ed.), Handbook of marriage and the family (pp. 171–211). Chicago: Rand McNally.Google Scholar
  58. Himmelfarb, G. (1987). The new history and the old. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  59. Hoffert, S. (1989). Private Matters: American attitudes toward childbearing and infant nurture in the urban North, 1800–1860. Chicago: University of Illinois Press.Google Scholar
  60. Homans, G. (1967). The nature of social science. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World.Google Scholar
  61. Horan, P. (1987). Theoretical models in social history research. Social Science History, 11, 379–400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Jones, J. (1985). Labor of love, labor of sorrow: Black women, work and the family from slavery to the present. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  63. Kertzer, D. (1984). Anthropology and family history. Journal of Family History, 9, 201–216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Kousser, J. (1989). The state of social science history in the late 1980s. Historical Methods, 22, 13–20.Google Scholar
  65. Kraditor, A. (1968). The ideas of the women’s suffrage movement, 1890–1920. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  66. Ladd-Taylor, M. (1986). Raising a baby the government way: Mothers’ letters to the Children’s Bureau, 1915–1932. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.Google Scholar
  67. Laird, M. (1981). Social dynamism in the late nineteenth century: Work and family interactions in Syracuse, New York. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Syracuse University.Google Scholar
  68. Langer, W. L. (1958). The next assignment. American Historical Review, 63, 283–304.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. Laslett, P. (1965). The world we have lost. New York: Scribner’s.Google Scholar
  70. Laslett, P. (1977). Family life and illicit love in earlier generations. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  71. Litchfield, R. (1969). Demographic characteristics of Florentine patrician families, 16th to the 19th centuries. Journal of Economic History, 29, 191–205.Google Scholar
  72. Lystra, K. (1989). Searching the heart: Women, men, and romantic love in nineteenth-century America. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  73. Mandle, J. (1979). Women and social change in America. Princeton, NJ: Princeton Book.Google Scholar
  74. McIntyre, J. (1966). The structural-functional approach to family study. In F. Nye and F. Berardo (Eds.), Emerging conceptual frameworks in family analysis (pp. 52–57). New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  75. Mintz, S., & Kellogg, S. (1988). Domestic revolutions: A social history of American family life. New York: Free Press.Google Scholar
  76. Modell, J., & Hareven, T. (1973). Urbanization and the malleable household: An examination of boarding and lodging in American families. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 35, 467–479.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Modell, J., Furstenberg, F., & Hershberg, T. (1976). Social change and transitions to adulthood in historical perspective. Journal of Family History, 1, 1–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Moss, W. (1988). Oral history: What is it, and where did it come from? In D. Striclin & R. Sharpless (Eds.), The past meets the present: Essays on oral history (pp. 5–14). New York: University Press of America.Google Scholar
  79. Nicholson, L. (1986). Gender and history: The limits of social theory in the age of the family. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  80. Nicolet, C. (1970). Prosopographie et histoire sociale. Anales: Economies, Societies, Civilizations, 3, 1209–1228.Google Scholar
  81. Parsons, T., & Bales, R. (1955). Family, socialization, and interaction process. Glencoe, IL: Free Press.Google Scholar
  82. Pickett, R. (1969). Clio: The missing muse in family life education. The Family Coordinator, 18, 27–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. Pickett, R. (1987). Benjamin Spock and the Spock papers at Syracuse University. Syracuse University Library Associates Courier, 22, 3–22.Google Scholar
  84. Pitts, J. (1964). The structural-functional approach. In H. Christensen (Ed.), Handbook of marriage and the family (pp. 51–124). Chicago: Rand McNally.Google Scholar
  85. Pleck, E. (1979). Black migration and poverty, Boston, 1865–1900. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  86. Pleck, E. (1987). Domestic tyranny: The making of American social policy against family violence from Colonial times to the present. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  87. Pollock, L. (1983). Forgotten children: Parent-child relations from 1500–1900. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  88. Queen, S., & Habenstein, R. (1952). The family in various cultures. Philadelphia: Lippincott.Google Scholar
  89. Ruggles, S. (1987). Prolonged connections: The rise of the extended family in nineteenth-century England and America Madison: University of Wisconsin Press.Google Scholar
  90. Ryan, M. (1981). Cradle of the middle class: The family in Oneida County, New York, 1790–1865. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  91. Ryan, M. (1982). The explosion of family history. Reviews of American History, 10, 181–195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. Sandburg, C. (1940). Abraham Lincoln (Sangamon ed.). New York: Harcourt, Brace.Google Scholar
  93. Saveth, E. (1963). The American patrician class: A field of research. American Quarterly, 15, 235–252.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  94. Schvaneveldt, J. (1966). The nuclear and extended family as reflected in autobiographical dedications: A comparative study. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 28, 495–497.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  95. Schvaneveldt, J. (1985). Marriages that endure: Assessment of golden wedding anniversary couples. Paper presented at the National Council on Family Relations, Dallas, Texas.Google Scholar
  96. Schvaneveldt, J., & Young, M. (1991). Assessing family historical methodology in the eighties: A content analysis. Working paper. Dept. of Family & Human Development, Utah State University, Logan, Utah.Google Scholar
  97. Schwartz, M. (1987). Historical sociology in the history of American sociology. Social Science History, 11, 1–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  98. Shorter, E. (1971). The historian and the computer: A practical guide. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  99. Shorter, E. (1975). The making of the modern family. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  100. Sirjamaki, J. (1964). The institutional approach. In H. Christensen (Ed.), Handbook of marriage and the family (pp. 33–50). Chicago: Rand McNally.Google Scholar
  101. Smith, D. (1973). Population, family, and society in Hingham, Massachusetts, 1635–1880. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, University of California.Google Scholar
  102. Stearns, P. (1980). Toward a wider vision: Trends in social history. In M. Kammen (Ed.), The past before us: Contemporary historical writing in the United States. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  103. Stephenson, C. (1980). The methodology of historical census record linkage: A user’s guide to Soundex. Journal of Family History, 5 112–115.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  104. Stoianovich, T. (1976). French historical method: The “Annales” paradigm. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  105. Stone, L. (1971). Prosopography. Daedalus, 100, 46–79.Google Scholar
  106. Stone, L. (1977). The family, sex, and marriage in England, 1500–1800. New York: Harper & Row.Google Scholar
  107. Thomas, W., & Znaniecki, F. (1918–1920). The Polish peasant in Europe and America (5 vols.). Boston: Richard G. Badger.Google Scholar
  108. Thompson, E. (1963). The making of the English working class. New York: Pantheon.Google Scholar
  109. Tilly, C. (1981). As sociology meets history: Studies in social discontinuity. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  110. Tilly, C. (1985). Retrieving European lives. In O. Zunz (Ed.), Reliving the past: The worlds of social history (pp. 1–52). Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.Google Scholar
  111. Tilly, C. (1987). Family history, social history, and social change. Journal of Family History, 12(1–3), 319–330.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  112. Tilly, L., & Cohen, M. (1982). Does the family have a history? Social Science History, 6(2), 131–179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  113. Tilly, L., & Scott, J. (1978). Women, work, and family. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.Google Scholar
  114. Ulrich, L. (1983). Good wives: Image and reality in the lives of women in Northern New England, 1650–1750. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  115. Van Den Braembussche, A. (1989). Historical explanations in comparative method: Some fundamental criticisms of metatheory. History and Theory, 28, 1–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  116. Vann, R. (1979). History and demography. History and Theory, 8 (supplement), 64–78.Google Scholar
  117. Wrigley, E. (Ed.) (1966). An introduction to English historical demography. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  118. Wrigley, E. (1969). Population and History. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  119. Wrigley, E. (1977). Reflections on the history of the family. Daedalus, 106, 71–85.Google Scholar
  120. Zimmerman, C. (1947). Family and civilization. New York: Harper.Google Scholar
  121. Zunz, O. (1985). The synthesis of social change: Reflections on American social history. In O. Zunz (Ed.), Reliving the past: The worlds of social history (pp. 53–114). Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jay D. Schvaneveldt
    • 1
  • Robert S. Pickett
    • 2
  • Margaret H. Young
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Family and Human DevelopmentUtah State UniversityLogan
  2. 2.CFCS DepartmentSyracuse UniversitySyracuse
  3. 3.Department of Family and Human DevelopmentUtah State UniversityLogan

Personalised recommendations