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Family Theory and Methods in the Classics

  • Bert N. Adams
  • Suzanne K. Steinmetz

Abstract

Great strides have been made in family theory and methods in the past 30 years. The works of W. J. Goode, Bernard Farber, Reuben Hill and recent feminist scholars have advanced theories concerning many aspects of the family. This chapter is intended to remind us that theorizing about the family has a long and rich history. The sociocultural milieu surveyed here is primarily that of the great thinkers of Western civilization such as Plato, Aristotle, and Rousseau, who described, defined, and commented on family life. While we would like to avoid continuing a Euro-Caucasian focus in the study of human thought, our own education and experiences have this bias. Non-Western thinkers are incorporated whenever possible, but we must acknowledge that the classical theories discussed here were promulgated by theorists who were primarily male, white, and Western, for the consumption of an audience that was primarily male, white, and Western.

Keywords

Family Life Original Work Fourth Century Great Book Preceding Chapter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bert N. Adams
    • 1
  • Suzanne K. Steinmetz
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of WisconsinMadison
  2. 2.Department of Sociology and Family Research InstituteIndiana UniversityIndianapolis

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