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Emerging Biosocial Perspectives on the Family

  • Kay Michael Troost
  • Erik Filsinger

Abstract

An explosion of thinking and research on biosocial perspectives on the family has occurred in recent years.1 Three major developments have contributed: advances in evolutionary thinking, findings of proximate biological interplay with social and psychological forces, and changes in the field of family studies.2 One aspect of a biosocial perspective has been the application of evolutionary thinking to human and family understanding. Evolutionary theory provides a useful interpretive framework for findings in the biosocial domain, the connection between the biological and the social as (1) independent causal agents, and more importantly, (2) as intertwined elements of human evolution and proximate family life. Biosocial findings can stand alone; we argue, however, that they are better predicted, constrained, and understood using evolutionary principles.

Keywords

Family Violence Marital Satisfaction Parental Investment Inclusive Fitness Paternal Investment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kay Michael Troost
    • 1
  • Erik Filsinger
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleigh
  2. 2.Private IndustryScottsdale

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