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Reframing Theories for Understanding Race, Ethnicity, and Families

  • Peggye Dilworth-Anderson
  • Linda M. Burton
  • Leanor Boulin Johnson

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to discuss what conceptual perspectives and theoretical frameworks explain and predict family phenomena among ethnic minority families. Three major discussions provide the basis to our examination: (1) restructuring assumptions and values to reflect ethnic reality; (2) creating new ways of thinking about ethnic minority families to enhance culturally relevant conceptual frameworks on the family; and (3) reframing existing theoretical perspectives and ideologies to explain and predict family phenomena among these families. Central to each of these discussions is the importance of cultural distinctiveness as it relates to the family.

Keywords

Family Therapy Nuclear Family Black Child Black Family White Family 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peggye Dilworth-Anderson
    • 1
  • Linda M. Burton
    • 2
  • Leanor Boulin Johnson
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Human Development and Family RelationsUniversity of North Carolina at GreensboroGreensboro
  2. 2.Department of Human Development and Family StudiesPennsylvania State UniversityUniversity Park
  3. 3.Department of Family Resources and Human DevelopmentArizona State UniversityTemple

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