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Feminist Theories

The Social Construction of Gender in Families and Society
  • Marie Withers Osmond
  • Barrie Thorne

Abstract

Where are the women? That short question, raised and put forward by feminist movements, has opened fresh perspectives on social and historical life. Clearly, women were not absent from traditional research on families, as they were from studies of politics and paid work. In fact, women have often been equated with and conceptually confined to “family.” But that assumption, like others basic to traditional ways of thinking about families, has distorted women’s—and men’s—experiences. Feminist theories ask us to step back and to rethink our assumptions, especially about issues of gender, power, and the very nature and boundaries of “family.” These are, of course, fundamental concerns, and one of our main goals in this chapter is to dislodge feminist theory and research on gender from the rubric of marginalized “special issues” and to place these perspectives where they belong: at the center of thinking about families.

Keywords

Family Therapy Feminist Theory Gender Relation Feminist Scholar Radical Feminist 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marie Withers Osmond
    • 1
  • Barrie Thorne
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SociologyFlorida State UniversityTallahassee
  2. 2.Department of SociologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos Angeles

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