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Theories Emerging from Family Therapy

  • William J. Doherty
  • David A. BaptisteJr.

Abstract

This chapter describes contributions from the field of marriage and family therapy to theory about the family. It is intended for readers who have little familiarity with family therapy and emphasizes theories about how families function rather than how families change in therapy.

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Family Therapy Family Therapist Express Emotion Family Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • William J. Doherty
    • 1
  • David A. BaptisteJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Family Social ScienceUniversity of MinnesotaSt. Paul
  2. 2.HCA Sun Valley Regional HospitalLas Cruces

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