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The Life Course Perspective Applied to Families Over Time

  • Vern L. Bengtson
  • Katherine R. Allen

Abstract

One of the enduring puzzles in the life sciences is the description and explanation of change over time. Such change is frequently called “development,” and the metaphors of growth and decline, gain and loss have often been employed to characterize change in structure or function of organisms over time. Cells, individuals, groups, and even social systems exhibit change over time. While most change is orderly, regular, and normative, some change is chaotic, irregular, and unpredicted. Growth or decline at the individual level often has antecedents or consequences at the collective group level.

Keywords

Social Change Family Life Cohort Analysis American Sociological Review Life Story 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vern L. Bengtson
    • 1
  • Katherine R. Allen
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and the Gerontology Research InstituteUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos Angeles
  2. 2.Department of Family and Child DevelopmentVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburg

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