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Human Ecology Theory

  • Margaret M. Bubolz
  • M. Suzanne Sontag

Abstract

Human ecology theory is unique in its focus on humans as both biological organisms and social beings in interaction with their environment.1 In this theory the family is considered to be an energy transformation system that is interdependent with its natural physical-biological, human-built, and social-cultural milieu. Emphasis is given to the creation, use, and management of resources for creative adaptation, human development, and sustainability of environments.

Keywords

Family System Ecology Theory Ecological Perspective Family Development Human Ecology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margaret M. Bubolz
    • 1
  • M. Suzanne Sontag
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Family and Child Ecology, College of Human EcologyMichigan State UniversityEast Lansing
  2. 2.Department of Human Environment and Design, College of Human EcologyMichigan State UniversityEast Lansing

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