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Active Bioremediation

  • Paul B. Hatzinger
  • Charles E. Schaefer
  • Evan E. Cox
Part of the SERDP/ESTCP Environmental Remediation Technology book series (SERDP/ESTCP)

6.1 Background and General Approach

The primary engineering approaches that have been tested for in situ perchlorate treatment are as follows: (1) “active systems” that meter and mix soluble electron donors into groundwater during continuous active pumping; (2) “semi-passive systems” that mix soluble electron donors into groundwater during intermittent pumping; and (3) “passive systems” that apply slow-release electron donors in trenches, wells, or using direct-push methods and rely upon natural groundwater flow to mix electron donor with contaminated water. This chapter focuses on the application of active treatment systems for perchlorate, whereas Chapters 7, 8 and 9 address the alternate approaches.

Active treatment systems can be implemented using a variety of different designs based on site conditions, but generally function either through subsurface groundwater recirculation or extraction and reinjection of groundwater. A soluble electron donor is metered and mixed into...

Keywords

Electron Donor Groundwater Flow Injection Well Groundwater Extraction Chlorine Dioxide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul B. Hatzinger
    • 1
  • Charles E. Schaefer
    • 1
  • Evan E. Cox
    • 2
  1. 1.Shaw Environmental, Inc.Lawrenceville
  2. 2.Geosyntec Consultants, Inc.GuelphCanada

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