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Stock at Risk

  • John Watt
  • Stefan Doytchinov
  • Roger-Alexandre Lefèvre
  • Anda Ionescu
  • Daniel de la Fuente
  • Kateřina Kreislová
  • Augusto Screpanti
Chapter

The damage functions discussed in Chapters 3 and 4 can be used to assess the impact of pollution by calculating the rate at which a given material will corrode or soil. If it is desirable for policy development to estimate a regional impact, there is one other vital data component required, which is an estimate of the amount of each material being affected that is known as the stock at risk. This vital area remains seriously under-researched, mainly due to the high cost and complexity of compiling inventories. To date actually, there are no stock-at-risk estimates of any heritage materials at a continental level. Some research groups and institutions have tried to develop maps of heritage at risk in different countries, frequently based on different criteria, choosing different parameters of risk and materials.

Keywords

Cultural Heritage Black Crust Individual Building British Geological Survey Historical Monument 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors of this chapter wish to express their appreciation to all the colleagues in the MULTI-ASSESS and CULT-STRAT consortia for their support, provision of data and stimulating discussions. We are particularly grateful to Fernando Viejo, Jesús M. Vega and M. Morcillo from the National Centre for Metallurgical Research (CENIM/CSIC), Madrid, Spain, Edward Andrews, Middlesex University, UK, Jan Bryscejn, ITAM, and Dagmar Knotková from SVOUM, Czech Republic for their contributions to this chapter.

References

References

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Sources of Additional Information

  1. Some details of the Risk Map of Cultural Heritage in Italy can be found here:Google Scholar
  2. The defining of the character of landscapes discussed above is being undertaken by English Nature and The Countryside Agency and further details can be found on the Countryside Agency’s websiteGoogle Scholar
  3. More details of the objects described in the case study can be found at:Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Watt
    • 1
  • Stefan Doytchinov
    • 2
  • Roger-Alexandre Lefèvre
    • 3
  • Anda Ionescu
    • 4
  • Daniel de la Fuente
    • 5
  • Kateřina Kreislová
    • 6
  • Augusto Screpanti
    • 2
  1. 1.Centre for Decision Analysis and Risk Management, School of Health and Social SciencesMiddlesex UniversityThe BurroughsUK
  2. 2.ENEA – Environmental Department301 S.P. Anguillarese, Santa Maria di GaleriaItaly
  3. 3.Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes AtmosphériquesUniversity of Paris 12Créteil CedexFrance
  4. 4.CERTES, University of Paris 12Créteil CedexFrance
  5. 5.Materials EngineeringDegradation and Durability National Centre for Metallurgical Research (CENIM/CSIC)Spain
  6. 6.SVUOM, U Mestanskeho pivovaru 934/4Czech Republic

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