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Groundwater in the Urban Environment

  • Peter Shanahan
Chapter

Groundwater is a critical resource for many of the world’s cities. While a few cities (for example, New York) rely upon protected surface-water reservoirs for their supply, many more depend on groundwater. Conservation, protection, and management of groundwater are thus necessities for most cities. This chapter reviews the basics of groundwater hydrology, supply, and water quality, and then goes on to examine groundwater in the specific context of the urban environment.

Keywords

Hydraulic Conductivity Groundwater Quality Rise Water Level Groundwater Supply High Hydraulic Conductivity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Shanahan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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