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Inflammation, Carcinogenicity and Hypersensitivity

  • Patrick Doherty

Abstract

Biomaterials, be they metal or polymer, ceramic or glass or some combination of all of these, when placed inside the human body are not normally rejected. The term rejection in this context generally refers to an adverse immunological response analogous to that seen when patients reject an organ transplant. For the most part, non-biological materials when placed in contact with human tissue, either upon or beneath the skin are well tolerated and may become “accepted” by the body. In these circumstances, if the implant is then able to effectively carry out its function for the required period of time, it may be described as expressing biocompatibility.

Keywords

Wound Healing Process Foreign Agent Foreign Body Giant Cell Chronic Inflammatory Response Wound Healing Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Lifelong LearningUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK

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