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Specialized Fabrication Processes: Rapid Prototyping

  • C.K. Chua
  • K.F. Leong
  • K.H. Tan

Rapid Prototyping (RP), otherwise known as solid freeform fabrication, originally developed in the late 1980s as a technique for manufacturing engineering, has evolved rapidly over the years to create a niche in the field of biomedical engineering. From the manufacturing of medical devices to customized micro-architectural implants, the manufacturing flexibility and capabilities of RP systems make it one of the most favorable systems for such biomedical applications.

Keywords

Rapid Prototype Selective Laser Sinter Fuse Deposition Modeling Tissue Engineer Scaffold Point Cloud Data 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Mechanical and Aerospace EngineeringNanyang Technological UniversitySingapore

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