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Ophthalmic Biomaterials

  • Rachel L. Williams
  • David Wong

Ophthalmology is a branch of medicine that has seen many technological advances in recent years. Lasers are used for imaging and treating many eye conditions and their capabilities are further enhanced by computers and culminate in the integration of devices with neuronal elements to produce “artificial vision.” In virtually all endeavors to develop therapies involving eye surgery, biomaterials play a central part [6, 15] (Fig. 12.1). Contact lenses are worn on the corneal surface to improve visual acuity in place of spectacles. Corneal implants, or keratoprostheses have been designed to replace diseased or damaged cornea that have become opaque. Intraocular lenses are implanted following cataract surgery to replace the opaque crystalline lens. Viscoelastic substances have revolutionized cataract surgery enabling the first truly “key-hole” operations.

Keywords

Contact Lens Retinal Detachment Refractive Error Intraocular Lens Oxygen Permeability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Clinical Engineering and Ophthalmology, School of Clinical SciencesUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK
  2. 2.St Paul’s Eye UnitRoyal Liverpool University HospitalLiverpoolUK
  3. 3.The LKS Faculty of MedicineEye Institute, HBHA Centre, University of Hong KongHong Kong

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