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Social Competency

  • Martin Bloom
Chapter
Part of the Issues in Children’s and Families’ Lives book series (IICL, volume 10)

Social competency is a term of many possible meanings, requiring that I define how I will be using the concept, lest you march off in one assumed direction while I gallop off in another. To begin with, I think of social competency as the conceptual intersection of an individual’s competence within various social settings, so that this chapter has three major tasks: (1) to define individual competence; (2) to identify the social – and cultural and physical – environments and historic time period within which an individual plays out his or her life in moment-to-moment interactions; and (3) to discuss how we might assist young people (about the ages of 5–13 years) toward the goal of achieving social competence in the multiple environments of their lives, with special reference to after-school activities.

Individual Competencies of Youth

What a wondrous thing is the human being, as the poets have pointed out, leaving it to the literarily challenged social scientists to specify just what is...

Keywords

Social Competency Operational Definition Hard Drug Popular Music Leaky Bucket 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.AshfordUSA

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