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Technology for Remediation and Disposal of Arsenic

  • Pornsawan Visoottiviseth
  • Feroze Ahmed
Chapter
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 197)

I Introduction

Arsenic contamination of water is a major public health problem in many countries worldwide. Symptoms of arsenic exposure have no known effective treatment, but drinking arsenic-free water can reduce risk to affected populations and alleviate symptoms of arsenic toxicity. In areas where the drinking water supply contains unsafe levels of arsenic, two main options have been identified: either find a safe source (mitigation) and/or remove arsenic from the contaminated source (remediation). Substantial effort has been invested in developing techniques for removing arsenic from water. Some of these techniques have been field implemented, while others are only performed in the laboratory. For any effective technology to be appropriate for use in affected areas of developing countries, it should ideally be simple, low cost, versatile, transferable, and should use local resources. Most importantly, such technologies must be accessible to local communities and especially to...

Keywords

Granular Activate Carbon Arsenic Content Arsenic Removal Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure Deep Tube 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.P. Visoottiviseth Biology Department, Faculty of ScienceMahidol UniversityBangkok Thailand

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