Advertisement

Development of Microsatellite Markers for Brachiaria brizantha and Germplasm Diversity Characterization of this Tropical Forage Grass

  • Letícia Jungmann
  • Patrícia M. Francisco
  • Adna C.B. Sousa
  • Jussara Paiva
  • Cacilda B. do Valle
  • Anete P. de Souza

Abstract

Grasses of the African genus Brachiaria are the most widely planted forages in Brazil. We previously reported the construction of microsatellite-enriched libraries for five Brachiaria species. Now the development of microsatellite markers for B. brizantha and their use for the genetic characterization of morphologically divergent accessions of the germplasm collection of Embrapa are presented. Fifteen pairs of primers were designed and assayed on 23 genotypes. From the fifteen loci evaluated, ten were polymorphic. The divergence between genotypes was estimated using Jaccard's coefficient of similarity and UPGMA method was used for clustering genotypes. The results showed that microsatellites are powerful tools for characterizing genetic diversity of Brachiaria species.

Keywords

Germplasm Collection UPGMA Method Repetitive Motif Tropical Forage International Plant Genetic Resource Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alves ER, Carneiro VTC, Dusi DMA (2007) In situ localization of three cDNA sequences associated to the later stages of aposporic embryo sac development of Brachiaria brizantha. Protoplasma 231:161–171CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Bogdan AV (1977) Tropical pasture and fodder plants. Longman, LondonGoogle Scholar
  3. Carneiro VTC, Araújo ACG, Lenis-Manzano SJ, Rodrigues JCM, Cabral GB, Leite JA, Silveira ED, Pereira RFA (2000) Genetic transformation of Brachiaria sp. by microprojectile bombardment. In: XVI International Congress on Sexual Plant Reproduction. Program and Abstracts, Banff, p 44Google Scholar
  4. Jungmann L, Valle, CB do Laborda PR, Resende RMS, Jank L, Souza AP (2005) Construction of microsatellite-enriched libraries for tropical forage species and characterization of repetitive sequences found in Brachiaria brizantha: . InHumphreys MO (ed) Molecular breeding for the genetic improvement of forage crops and turf. Wageningen Academic Publishers, Wageningen, p 128Google Scholar
  5. McCouch SR, Chen XL, Panaud O, Temnykh S, Xu Y, Cho YG, Huang N, Ishii T, Blair M (1997) Microsatellite marker development, mapping and applications in rice genetics and breeding. Plant Mol Biol 35:89–99CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Miles JW, Valle CB do (1996) Manipulation of apomixis in Brachiaria: breeding. InMiles JW, Maass BL, Valle CB do (eds) Brachiaria. : biology, agronomy and improvementEmbrapa/CIAT, Cali, pp 164–177Google Scholar
  7. Miles JW, Maass BL, Valle CB do (1996) Brachiaria. : biology, agronmy and improvementEmbrapa/CIAT, CaliGoogle Scholar
  8. Pagliarini MS, Pascoto CR, Valle CB do (2005) Meiotic behavior in interspecific hybrids between Brachiaria ruziziensis and Brachiaria brizantha (Poaceae) Euphytica 42:155–159Google Scholar
  9. Pagliarini MS, Mendes DV, Boldrini KR, Bonato ABM, Valle CB do (2006) Cytological evidence of natural hybridization in Brachiaria brizantha. Stapf (Gramineae) Biol J Linnean Soc 150:441–446CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Pagliarini MS, Valle CB do, Gallo PH, Lonardoni PM, Boldrini KR, Pascotto CR (2007) 2n gamete formation in the genus Brachiaria. (Poaceae: Paniceae) Euphytica 154:255–260CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Pereira AV, Valle CB do, Ferreira RP, Miles JW (2001) Nass LL, Valois ACC, Valadares-Inglis MC, de Melo IS (eds) Melhoramento de forrageiras tropicais. In: Recursos genéticos & melhoramento – Plantas. Fundação MT, Rondonópolis, pp 549–601Google Scholar
  12. Renvoize SA, Clayton WD, Habuye CHS (1996) Morphology, taxonomy, and natural distribution of Brachiaria. In: (Trin.) GrisebMiles JW, Maass BL, Valle CB do (eds) Brachiaria. : biology, agronmy and improvementEmbrapa/CIAT, Cali, pp 1–15Google Scholar
  13. Rodrigues JCM, Cabral GB, Dusi DM de A, Mello LV, Rigden D, Carneiro VTC (2003) Identification of differentially expressed cDNA sequences in ovaries of sexual and apomictic plants of Brachiaria brizantha. Plant Mol Biol 53:745–757CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Serrão EAS, Simão Neto MS (1971) Informações sobre duas espécies de gramíneas forrageiras do gênero Brachiaria na Amazônia: B. decumbens Stapf e B. ruziziensis Germain et Evrard. Instituto de Pesquisa e Experimentação Agropecuária do Norte, BelémGoogle Scholar
  15. Silveira ED, Cabral GB, Rodrigues JCM, Costa SS, Carneiro VTC (2003) Evaluation of exogenous promoters for use in Brachiaria brizantha. transformation J Plant Biotech 5:87–93Google Scholar
  16. Temnykh S, DeClerck G, Lukashova A, Lipovich L, Cartinhour S, McCouch S (2001) Computational and experimental analysis of microsatellites in rice (Oryza sativa L.): frequency, length varia-tion, transposon associations, and genetic marker potential. Genome Res 11:1441–1452CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Letícia Jungmann
    • 1
    • 2
  • Patrícia M. Francisco
    • 2
  • Adna C.B. Sousa
    • 2
  • Jussara Paiva
    • 2
  • Cacilda B. do Valle
    • 1
  • Anete P. de Souza
    • 2
  1. 1.Embrapa Beef CattleCampo GrandeBrazil
  2. 2.State University of CampinasCampinasBrazil

Personalised recommendations