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Seed Transmission of Endophytic Fungus, Neotyphodium occultans, in Cross Breeding of Italian Ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) Using Detached Panicle Culture, and Comparison with Situations in Interspecific/Intergeneric crossings including Festuca species

  • Koya Sugawara
  • Akira Arakawa
  • Takuya Shiba
  • Hiroto Ohkubo
  • Takao Tsukiboshi
Conference paper

Abstract

Neotyphodium species are seed-transmitted endophytic fungi that form mutualistic (symbiotic) associations with grasses of the subfamily Pooideae, and their presence can increase stress tolerance of host grasses. Italian (annual) ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) clones infected with N. occultans were pollinated by pollen from annual ryegrass and perennial ryegrass (L. perenne) using detached panicles, and from tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) by conventional bagging, as part of studies on the use of this endophytic fungus to enhance productivity of this important forage grass and also of interspecific/intergeneric hybrids. In mating involving L. multiflorum, 64–100% seed transmission ratios of the fungus were observed among 13 cross-combinations, along with one exceptional case of no infection. In mating with L. perenne 53–100% transmission was observed, whereas less than 30% transmission was observed in crosses involving F. arundinacea. The results indicated that the symbiont can be seed transmitted through mating using detached panicles, and the possibility of poor compatibility between N. occultans and some L. multiflorum genotypes as well as with L .perenne and F. arundinacea.

Keywords

Endophytic Fungus Tall Fescue Perennial Ryegrass Fungal Endophyte Italian Ryegrass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Koya Sugawara
    • 1
  • Akira Arakawa
    • 1
  • Takuya Shiba
    • 1
  • Hiroto Ohkubo
    • 2
  • Takao Tsukiboshi
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of Livestock and Grassland ScienceTochigi 329-2793Japan
  2. 2.Japan International Research Center for Agricultural SciencesIbaraki 305-8686Japan

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