DREB Regulons in Abiotic-Stress-Responsive Gene Expression in Plants


Plant growth and productivity is affected by various abiotic stresses such as drought, high salinity, and low temperature. Expression of a variety of genes is induced by these stresses in various plants. In the signal transduction network from perception of stress signals to stress-responsive gene expression, various transcription factors and cis-acting elements in the stress-responsive gene expression function for plant adaptation to environmental stresses. The dehydration-responsive element (DRE)/C-repeat (CRT) cis-acting element is involved in osmotic- and cold-stress-inducible gene expression. Transcription factors that bind to the DRE/CRT were isolated and named DREB1/CBF and DREB2. DREB1/CBF regulon is involved in cold-stress-responsive gene expression, whereas, DREB2 is involved in osmotic-stress-responsive gene expression. Recently, we highlight transcriptional regulation of gene expression in response to drought and cold stresses, with particular emphasis on the role of DREB regulon in stress-responsive gene expression.


Cold Stress Freezing Stress Curr Opin Plant Biol DREB1A Gene Negative Regulatory Domain 
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© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Plant Molecular Physiology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life SciencesThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Biological Resources DivisionJapan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS)TsukubaJapan
  3. 3.RIKEN Plant Science CenterTsurumi, YokohamaKanagawaJapan
  4. 4.CRESTJapan Science and Technology Corporation (JST)KawaguchiJapan

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