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Genetic Diversity and Association Mapping of Three O-Methyltransferase Genes in Maize and Tropical Grasses

  • Baldomero Alarcon-Zuniga
  • Adriana Hernandez-Garcia
  • Elias Vega-Vicente
  • Cuauhtemoc Cervantes-Martinez
  • Marilyn Warburton
  • Teresa Cervantes-Martinez
Conference paper

Abstract

Lignification and degradation of cell walls in tropical grasses have been considered complex metabolic processes. These involve a wide number of genes and interactions among structural carbohydrates per se, maturity, and monolignol precursor biosynthesis and content including siryngyl, guaiacyl, and p-coumaryl. Three major genes involved in lignin precursor biosynthesis are two caffeoyl-CoA 3-0-methyltransferase genes (CCoAOMT1 and CCoAOMT2) and the aldehyde O-methyltransferase gene (AldOMT). The objective of this study was the identification of the number and frequencies of alleles and nucleotide diversity of the three O-methyltransferase genes in 79 maize S9 inbred populations originating from Mexican biracial crosses and six tropical perennial grass species, and their association to cell wall degradability. The six tropical grasses genotypes were stargrass (Cynodon plectostachyus), bermudagrass (C. dactylon), palisadegrass (Brachiaria brizantha), kinggrass (Pennisetum purpurem), and guineagrass (Panicum maximum). Among the maize inbred populations, we identified two alleles in CCoAOMT1 (polymorphic information content (PIC) = 0.23), eight in CCoAOMT2 (PIC = 0.73), two in AldOMT-Exon1 (PIC = 0.36), three in AldOMT-Exon2 (PIC = 0.69) and five in AldOMT-Intron. All PCR primers amplified in the tropical grass genotypes except AldOMT-Exon1, and two (PIC = 0.31), four (PIC = 0.69), seven (PIC = 0.38), and eight alleles (PIC = 0.71) were found in the above mentioned genes, respectively. Phylogeny analysis clustered the maize populations into six groups strongly related to ecogeographical origin, and no association resulted within the tropical grasses (57% nucleotide identity of gene sequences). A negative genetic correlation between neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, crude protein and in vitro dry matter digestibility was found with CCoAOMT2 and AldOMT-Exon2 (r > 0.61). We identified two candidate CCoAOMT2 alleles and three AldOMT alleles that could contribute to the improvement of exotic maize germplasm for digestibility (and thus for use as a forage crop and production of bioethanol), but useless for the genotypes of tropical grasses studied herein.

Keywords

Association Mapping Neutral Detergent Fiber Polymorphic Information Content Acid Detergent Fiber Inbred Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Baldomero Alarcon-Zuniga
    • 1
  • Adriana Hernandez-Garcia
    • 1
  • Elias Vega-Vicente
    • 1
  • Cuauhtemoc Cervantes-Martinez
    • 2
  • Marilyn Warburton
    • 1
  • Teresa Cervantes-Martinez
    • 2
  1. 1.Universidad Autónoma Chapingo. Carr.MéxMexico
  2. 2.Int. Applied Biotechnology Center, CIMMYT, El BatanTexcocoMexico

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