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Smoking

  • Dianne Lavin
Chapter

What is Nicotine Dependence?

Nicotine dependence is characterized by tolerance to nicotine and withdrawal symptoms when tobacco use is discontinued (American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Nicotine can be found in smokeless tobacco products, cigars, and cigarettes. Cigarette smoking is the focus of this chapter as it represents the most addictive and popular form of nicotine use. Smoking delivers nicotine to the brain within seconds; hence, dependence develops from rapid and frequent reinforcement. Over time, a smoker develops tolerance, finding it necessary to increase both the dose and frequency of nicotine use. Withdrawal symptoms include craving, dysphoria, irritability, anxiety, restlessness, impaired concentration, insomnia, craving for sweets, and weight gain (American Psychiatric Association, 2000).

Basic Facts About Cigarette Smoking

Cigarette smoking is the most preventable cause of morbidity and death in the United States. One in every five Americans dies annually as a...

Keywords

Smoking Cessation Nicotine Dependence Nicotine Replacement Therapy Tobacco Cessation Tobacco User 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Schofield Barracks Family Practice ClinicSchofield BarracksUSA

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