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A “Sensational” Way to Understand and Serve Children: Illustration of a Sensory Processing Model

  • Winnie Dunn

Abstract

A growing body of literature suggests that the way people respond to sensory experiences in their everyday lives can both be characterized and serve as a useful assessment and intervention planning template (Dunn, 2001, 2007a, b; Dunn, Myles, & Orr, 2002; Myles et al., 2004; Rogers, Hepburn, & Wehner, 2003). Receiving and processing sensation is a core feature of brain activity, and therefore has the potential to influence many areas of performance and behavior. Understanding the patterns of sensory processing identified from research, and how these patterns affect children 's behavior, can be extremely useful for understanding complex situations with families and schools. Sensory processing knowledge broadens our ability to consider what might be influencing a child 's behavior and therefore provides insights about effective intervention possibilities. As this may be a new area of consideration for readers, we will review the basic concepts before presenting the case.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Occupational Therapist Sensory Input Occupational Therapy Asperger Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

Resources for Clinicians and Families

  1. Dunn, W. (2007a). Living sensationally: Understanding your Senses. Jessica Kingsley, United Kingdom. This book is written for the public, and explains with many examples, how sensory processing affects our everyday lives.Google Scholar
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  3. Dunn, W., Saiter, J., & Rinner, L. (2002). Asperger syndrome and sensory processing: A conceptual model and guidance for intervention planning. Focus on Autism and other Developmental Disabilities, 17(3), 172–185. This article provides a discussion about how to collaborate with educational and therapeutic strategies, and provides case examples.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Myles, B. S., Hagiwara, T., Dunn, W., Rinner, L., Reese, M., Huggins, A., et al. (2004). Sensory issues in Asperger syndrome and autism. Education and Training in Developmental Disabilities, December. This article discusses the similarities and differences between children with autism and Asperger syndrome.Google Scholar
  5. http://classes.kumc.edu/sah/resources/sensoryprocessing/index.htm a learning website about sensory processing concepts, research and case studies
  6. www.sensoryprofile.com information about the Sensory Profile measures

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Winnie Dunn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Occupational Therapy EducationUniversity of Kansas Medical CenterKansas City

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