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The Physiology of Peritoneal Solute, Water, and Lymphatic Transport

  • R. T. Krediet

Few studies have been published on the magnitude of the surface area of the peritoneum. Wegener mentioned a surface area of 1.72 m2 in one adult woman [1] and Putiloff a value of 2.07 m2 in one adult male [2]. More recent autopsy studies reported lower values [3–5]; the average peritoneal surface area in adults ranged from 1.0 m2 [3] to 1.3 m2 [5]. Using CT scanning in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients a value of 0.55 m2 has been found [6].

Keywords

Peritoneal Dialysis Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Peritoneal Dialysis Patient Peritoneal Membrane Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Academic Medical Center University of AmsterdamAmsterdamNetherlands

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