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Current Status of Peritoneal Dialysis

  • R. Mehrotra
  • E. W. Boeschoten

It was in 1923 that Ganter performed the first peritoneal dialysis (PD) in a woman with renal failure [1]. However, the early experience with intermittent peritoneal dialysis (IPD) was discouraging and led to the belief that PD was not an appropriate renal replacement therapy for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) [2]. The introduction of the concept of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) by Popovich et al. in 1976 [3] was initially met with scepticism, but the successful clinical experience in nine patients at two centers in the United States [4, 5] convinced skeptics about the potential of the technique as a viable alternative to hemodialysis. Over the last decades, PD has grown worldwide to become the third most common modality for renal replacement. In this chapter, we will present a brief overview of the major advances in the care of patients undergoing PD.

Keywords

Peritoneal Dialysis Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Peritoneal Dialysis Patient Residual Renal Function Dialysis Modality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and Los Angeles Biomedical Research InstituteLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Hans Mak InstituutEl NaardenThe Netherlands

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