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Adequacy of Peritoneal Dialysis, Including Fluid Balance

  • J. M. Burkart
  • J. M. Bargman

As a renal replacement therapy, dialysis, at best, can approximate only a portion of normal renal function (Table 16.1). Despite these deficiencies, however, dialysis has remarkably extended the lives of chronic kidney disease patients, some for decades. Although many patients do very well on dialysis, the survival of patients is markedly reduced compared to age- and race-matched people in the general population [1]. The extent to which ongoing uremia in the form of underdialysis contributes to this overall mortality rate in the dialysis population is unknown. Some have suggested that inadequacy in the prescribed dose of dialysis contributes to these high mortality rates [2, 3]. As a result, more attention has been paid to patient outcome and to optimizing total solute clearance.

Keywords

Peritoneal Dialysis Peritoneal Dialysis Patient Residual Renal Function Drain Volume Automate Peritoneal Dialysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Wake Forest University Health Sciences CenterBowman Gray School of MedicineNorth Carolina

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