Advertisement

Neurocognitive Interventions for Childhood and Adolescent Disorders: A Transactional Model

  • Phyllis Anne Teeter

Interest in the neuropsychological basis of childhood and adolescent disorders continues to grow (Gaddes & Edgell, 1994; Obrzut & Hynd, 1991; Rourke, 1991), and neurocognitive models for designing effective interventions for treating various disorders show promise (Teeter Ellison & Semrud-Clikeman, 2007).

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Phonological Awareness Reading Disability Learning Disability Social Skill Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  2. Archer, A., & Gleason, M. (1989). Skills for school success (grades 3-6). North Billerica, MA: Curriculum.Google Scholar
  3. Barclay, J. R. (1966). Sociometric choices and teacher rating as predictors of school dropout. Journal of Social Psychology, 4, 40-45.Google Scholar
  4. Barkley, R. A. (1990). Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder: A handbook for diagnosis and treatment. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  5. Bennett, T. L., & Krein, L. K. (1989). The neuropsychology of epilepsy: Psychological and social impact. In C. R. Reynolds & E. Fletcher-Janzen (Eds.), Handbook of clinical child neuropsychology (pp. 19-41). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  6. Berg, R. A. (1986). Neuropsychological effects of closed-head injury in children. In J. E. Obrzut & G. W. Hynd (Eds.), Child neuropsychology: Vol. 2. Clinical practice (pp. 113-135). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  7. Bigler, E. R. (1990). Traumatic brain injury: Mechanisms of damage, assessment, intervention and outcome. Austin, TX: PRO-ED.Google Scholar
  8. Bos, C. S., & Van Reusen, A. K. (1991). Academic interventions with learning-disabled students: A cognitive/metacognitive approach. In J. Obrzut & G. W. Hynd (Eds.), Neuropsychological foundations of learning disabilities (pp. 659-684). Orlando, FL: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  9. Brent, D. A., Crumrine, P. K., Varma, R. R., Allan, M. A., & Allman, C. (1987). Phenobarbital treatment and major depressive disorder in children with epilepsy. Pediatrics, 80, 909-917.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Bryan, T. (1991). Social problems and learning disabilities. In B. Y. L. Wong (Ed.), Learning about learning disabilities (pp. 195-229). Orlando, FL: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  11. Bryan, T., & Lee, J. (1990). Social skills training with learning disabled children and adolescents: The state of the art. In T. E. Scruggs & B. Y. L. Wong (Eds.), Intervention research in learning disabilities (pp. 263-278). Berlin: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  12. Byrne, B., & Fielding-Barnsley, R. (1993). Evaluation of a program to teach phonemic awareness to young children: A 1-year follow-up. Journal of Educational Psychology, 85, 104-111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Carlson, C. C., Lahey, B. B., Frame, C. L., Walker, J., & Hynd, G. W. (1987). Sociometric status of clinic-referred children with attention deficit disorders with and without hyperactivity. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 15, 537-547.Google Scholar
  14. Carlson, C. C., Pelham, W. E., Milich, R., & Dixon, M. (1992). Single and combined effects of methylphenidate and behavior therapy on the classroom behavior, academic performance, and self-evaluations of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 20, 213-232.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Carpentieri, S. C., & Mulhern, R. K. (1993). Patterns of memory dysfunction among children surviving temporal lobe tumors. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 8, 345-357.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Cook, E. H., & Leventhal, B. L. (1992). Neuropsychiatric disorders of childhood and adolescence. In S. C. Yudofsky & R. E. Hales (Eds.), The American Psychiatric Press textbook of neuropsychiatry (2nd ed., pp. 639-662). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.Google Scholar
  17. Craft, A. W., Shaw, D. A., & Cartlidge, N. E. (1972). Head injuries in children. British Medical Journal, 4, 200-203.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Cravioto, J., & Arrieta, R. (1983). Malnutrition in childhood. In M. D. Rutter (Ed.), Developmental neuropsychiatry (pp. 32-51). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  19. Cunningham, A. (1989). Phonemic awareness: The development of early reading competency. Reading Research Quarterly, 24, 471-472.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Cunningham, A. (1990). Explicit versus implicit instruction in phonemic awareness. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 50, 429-444.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Denkla, M. B. (1978). Minimal brain dysfunction. In J. S. Chall & A. F. Mirsky (Eds.), Education and the brain (pp. 223-268). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  22. Denkla, M. B. (1983). The neuropsychology of social-emotional learning disabilities. Archives of Neurology, 40, 461-462.Google Scholar
  23. Dubovsky, S. L. (1992). Psychopharmacological treatment in neuropsychiatry. In S. C. Yudofsky & R. E. Hales (Eds.), The American Psychiatric Press textbook of neuropsychiatry (2 nd ed., pp. 663-702). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.Google Scholar
  24. Duffy, G., Roehler, L., Sivan, E., Rackliff, G., Book, C., Meloth, M., et al. (1987). Effects of explaining the reasoning associated with using reading strategies. Reading Research Quarterly, 22, 345-368.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. DuPaul, G., & Henningson, P. N. (1993). Peer tutoring effects on the classroom performance of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. School Psychology Review, 22, 134-143.Google Scholar
  26. DuPaul, G., & Stoner, G. (1994). ADHD in the schools: Assessment and intervention strategies. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  27. Ellis, E. S., & Friend, P. (1991). Adolescents with learning disabilities. In B. Y. L. Wong (Ed.), Learning about learning disabilities (pp. 506-563). Orlando, FL: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  28. Ellis, E. S., & Lenz, B. K. (1991). The development of learning strategy interventions. Lawrence, KS: Edge Enterprise.Google Scholar
  29. Englert, C. S. (1990). Unraveling the mysteries of writing through strategy instruction. In T. E. Scruggs & B. Y. L. Wong (Eds.), Intervention research in learning disabilities (pp. 186-223). Berlin: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  30. Epstein, M. A., Shaywitz, S. E., Shaywitz, B. A., & Woolston, J. L. (1992). The boundaries of attention deficit disorder. In S. E. Shaywitz & B. A. Shaywitz (Eds.), Attention deficit disorder comes of age: Toward the twenty-first century (pp. 197-220). Austin, TX: PRO-ED.Google Scholar
  31. Felton, R. H., & Brown, I. S. (1991). Neuropsychological prediction of reading disabilities. In J. E. Obrzut & G. W. Hynd (Eds.), Neuropsychological foundations of learning disabilities: A handbook of issues, methods, and practice (pp. 387-410). San Diego, CA: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.Google Scholar
  32. Fleischner, J. E. (1994). Diagnosis and assessment of mathematics learning disabilities. In G. R. Lyon (Ed.), Frames of reference for the assessment of learning disabilities: New views on measurement issues (pp. 441-458). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.Google Scholar
  33. Fox, B., & Routh, D. K. (1976). Phonemic analysis and synthesis as word-attack skills. Journal of Educational Psychology, 69, 70-74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Gaddes, W. H., & Edgell, D. (1994). Learning disabilities and brain function: A neuropsychological approach (3rd ed.). Berlin: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  35. Gaskins, I., Downer, M., Anderson, R., Cunningham, P., Gaskins, R., Schommer, M., et al. (1988). A metacognitive approach to phonics: Using what we know to decode what you don't. RASE: Remedial and Special Education, 9, 36-66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Goldstein, F. C., & Levin, H. S. (1990). Epidemiology of traumatic brain injury: Incidence, clinical characteristics, and risk factors. In E. D. Bigler (Ed.), Traumatic brain injury: Mechanisms of damage, assessment, intervention and outcome (pp. 51-68). Austin, TX: PRO-ED.Google Scholar
  37. Graham, S., & Harris, K. R. (1987). Improving composition skills of inefficient learners with self-instructional strategy training. Topics in Language Disorders, 7, 66-77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Graham, S., & Harris, K. R. (1989). A components analysis of cognitive strategy instruction: Effects on learning disabled student's compositions and self-efficacy. Journal of Educational Psychology, 81, 353-361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Gray, J. W., & Dean, R. S. (1989). Approaches to the cognitive rehabilitation of children with neuropsychological impairment. In C. R. Reynolds & E. Fletcher-Janzen (Eds.), Handbook of clinical child neuropsychology (pp. 397-408). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  40. Green, W. H. (1991). Child and adolescent clinical psychopharmacology. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins.Google Scholar
  41. Greenwood, C. R., Delquardi, J., & Carta, J. J. (1988). Classwide peer tutoring. Seattle: Educational Achievement Systems.Google Scholar
  42. Greenwood, C. R., Maheady, L., & Carta, J. J. (1991). Peer tutoring programs in the regular education classroom. In G. Stoner, M. R. Shinn, & H. M. Walker (Eds.), Interventions for achievement and behavior problems (pp. 179-200). Silver Spring, MD: National Association of School Psychologists.Google Scholar
  43. Gresham, F. M., & Gansle, K. A. (1992). Misguided assumptions of DSM-III-R: Implications for school psychologists. School Psychology Quarterly, 7, 79-95.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Heins, E. D., Lloyd, J. W., & Hallahan, D. P. (1986). Cued and noncued self-recording to task. Behavior Modification, 10, 235-254.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Horton, A. M. (1979). Behavioral neuropsychology: Rationale and research. Clinical Neuropsychology, 1, 20-23.Google Scholar
  46. Horton, A. M., Jr., & Puente, A. E. (1986). Behavioral neuropsychology in children. In J. E. Obrzut & G. W. Hynd (Eds.), Child neuropsychology: Vol. 2. Clinical practice (pp. 299-316). Orlando, FL: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  47. Hynd, G. W. (1992). Misguided or simply misinformed? Comment on Gresham and Gansle's vitriolic diatribe regarding DSM. School Psychology Quarterly, 7, 100-103.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Hynd, G. W., Lorys, A. R., Semrud-Clikeman, M., Nieves, N., Huettner, M., & Lahey, B. B. (1991). Attention deficit disorder without hyperactivity: A distinct behavioral and neurocognitive syndrome. Journal of Child Neurology, 6(Suppl.), S37-S43.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  49. Hynd, G. W., & Willis, W. G. (1988). Pediatric neuropsychology. New York: Grune & Stratton.Google Scholar
  50. Iversen, S., & Tunmer, W. E. (1993). Phonological processing skills and the reading recovery program. Journal of Educational Psychology, 85, 112-126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Johnston, C., & Pelham, W. E. (1986). Teacher ratings predict peer ratings and aggression at 3-year follow-up in boys with attention deficit disorder hyperactivity. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 54, 571-572.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Kavale, K. (1990). Effectiveness of special education. In T. B. Gutkins & C. R. Reynolds (Eds.), The handbook of school psychology (2 nd ed., pp. 868-898). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  53. Kratochwill, T. R., & Bergan, J. R. (1990). Behavioral consultation in applied settings: An individual guide. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  54. Kratochwill, T. R., & Plunge, M. (1992). DSM-III-R, treatment validity, and functional analysis: Further considerations for school psychologists. School Psychology Review, 7, 227-232.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. La Greca, A. M. (1993). Social skills training with children: Where do we go from here? Presidential Address. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 22, 288-298.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Lambert, N. M., & Sandoval, J. (1980). The prevalence of learning disabilities in a sample of children considered to be hyperactive. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 8, 33-50.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Lerner, J. (1993). Learning disabilities: Theories, diagnosis, and teaching strategies (6th ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin.Google Scholar
  58. Levine, M. D. (1993). Developmental variations and learning disorders. Cambridge, MA: Educators Publishing Service.Google Scholar
  59. Levine, M. D. (1994). Educational care. Cambridge, MA: Educators Publishing Service.Google Scholar
  60. Liberman, I. Y., & Shankweiler, D. (1985). Phonology and the problems of learning to read and write. Remedial and Special Education, 6, 8-17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Lloyd, J. E., & Landrum, T. J. (1990). Self-recording of attending to task: Treatment components and generalization of effects. In T. E. Scruggs & B. Y. L. Wong (Eds.), Intervention research in learning disabilities (pp. 235-262). Berlin: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  62. Lundberg, I., Frost, J., & Petersen, O. P. (1988). Effects of an extensive program for stimulating phonological awareness in preschool children. Reading Research Quarterly, 23, 267-284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Mann, V. (1986). Why some children encounter reading problems. In J. Torgesen & B. Wong (Eds.), Psychological and educational perspectives on learning disabilities (pp. 133-159). Orlando, FL: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  64. Mann, V. (1991). Language problems: A key to early reading problems. In B. Y. L. Wong (Ed.), Learning about learning disabilities (pp. 130-163). Orlando, FL: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  65. Mash, E. J., & Terdal, L. G. (1988). Behavioral assessment of childhood disorders. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  66. Mattingly, I. G. (1972). Language by ear and eye: The relationship between speech and reading. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  67. Meyer, F. B., Marsh, W. R., Laws, E. R., & Sharbrough, F. W. (1986). Temporal lobectomy in children with epilepsy. Journal of Neurosurgery, 64, 371-376.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Milich, R., & Landau, S. (1989). The role of social status variables in differentiating subgroups of hyperactive children. In L. M. Bloomingdale & J. Swanson (Eds.), Attention deficit disorder: Current concepts and emerging trends in attentional and behavioral disorders of childhood (Vol. 5, pp. 1-16). Elmsford, NY: Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  69. Molter, J. (1993). The effects of phonemic awareness training on delayed readers. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee.Google Scholar
  70. Montague, M., & Bos, C. (1986). The effect of cognitive strategy training on verbal math problem solving performance of learning disabled adolescents. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 19, 26-33.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Neppe, V. M. (1985). Epilepsy and psychiatry: Essential links. Psychiatric Insight, 2, 18-22.Google Scholar
  72. Neppe, V. M., & Tucker, G. J. (1992). Neuropsychiatric aspects of seizure disorders. In S. C. Yudofsky & R. E. Hales (Eds.), The American Psychiatric Press textbook of neuropsychiatry (2nd ed., pp. 397-425). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.Google Scholar
  73. Northcutt, T. E. (1987). The impact of a social skills training program on the teacher-student relationship. Dissertation Abstracts International, 46, 1231A.Google Scholar
  74. Nussbaum, N. L., Bigler, E. D., & Koch, W. (1986). Neuropsychologically derived subgroups of learning disabled children: Personality behavioral dimensions. Journal of Research and Development in Education, 19, 57-67.Google Scholar
  75. Obrzut, J. E., & Hynd, G. W. (Eds.). (1991). Neuropsychological foundations of learning disabilities: A handbook of issues, methods, and practice. San Diego, CA: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.Google Scholar
  76. Olson, R., Foltz, G., & Wise, B. (1986). Reading instruction and remediation with the aid of computer speech. Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers, 18, 93-99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Olson, R., Fosberg, H., Wise, B., & Rack, J. (1994). Measurement of word recognition, orthographic, and phonological skills. In G. R. Lyon (Ed.), Frames of reference for the assessment of learning disabilities: New views on measurement issues (pp. 243-278). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.Google Scholar
  78. Palinscar, A., Brown, A., & Martin, S. (1987). Peer interaction in reading comprehension instruction. Educational Psychologist, 22, 231-253.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Parker, J. G., & Asher, S. R. (1987). Peer relations and later personal adjustment: Are low-accepted children at risk? Psychological Bulletin, 102, 357-389.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. Pazzaglia, P., & Frank-Pazzaglia, L. (1976). Record in grade school of pupils with epilepsy: An epidemiological study. Epilepsia, 17, 361-366.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. Pelham, W. E. (1993a). Recent developments in pharmacological treatment for child and adolescent mental health disorders. School Psychology Review, 22, 158-161.Google Scholar
  82. Pelham, W. E. (1993b). Pharmacotherapy for children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. School Psychology Review, 22, 199-227.Google Scholar
  83. Price, T. P., Goetz, K. L., & Lovell, M. R. (1992). Neuropsychiatric aspects of brain tumors. In S. C. Yudofsky & R. E. Hales (Eds.), The American Psychiatric Press textbook of neuropsychiatry (2 nd ed., pp. 473-498). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.Google Scholar
  84. Raphael, T. E., Kirschner, C. S., & Englert, C. S. (1986). The impact of text instruction within a process writing orientation on fifth and sixth grade students' comprehension and production of expository text. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco.Google Scholar
  85. Reitan, R. M. (1980). REHABIT-Reitan evaluation of hemispheric abilities and brain involvement training. Tucson, AZ: Reitan Neuropsychology Laboratory and University of Arizona.Google Scholar
  86. Reitan, R. M., & Wolfson, D. (1992). Neuropsychological evaluation of older children. Tucson, AZ: Neuropsychology Press.Google Scholar
  87. Reschly, D. J., & Gresham, F. M. (1989). Current neuropsychological diagnosis of learning problems: A leap of faith. In C. R. Reynolds & E. Fletcher-Janzen (Eds.), Handbook of clinical child neuropsychology (pp. 503-519). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  88. Rourke, B. (1989). Nonverbal learning disabilities: The syndrome and the model. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  89. Rourke, B. (Ed.). (1991). Neuropsychological validation of learning disabilities subtypes. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  90. Rourke, B. (1994). Neuropsychological assessment of children with learning disabilities: Measurement issues. In C. R. Lyon (Ed.), Frames of reference for the assessment of learning disabilities: New views on measurement issues (pp. 475-514). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.Google Scholar
  91. Rourke, B., Bakker, D., Fisk, J., & Strang, J. (1983). Child neuropsychology: An introduction to theory, research, and clinical practice. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  92. Rourke, B., Del Dotto, J. E., Rourke, S. B., & Casey, J. E. (1990). Nonverbal learning disabilities: The syndrome and a case study. Journal of School Psychology, 28, 361-385.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  93. Rourke, B., Fisk, J. L., & Strang, J. D. (1986). Neuropsychological assessment of children: A treatment-oriented approach. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  94. Rourke, B., & Fuerst, D. R. (1991). Learning disabilities and psychosocial functioning: A neuropsychological perspective. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  95. Rourke, B., Young, G. C., & Leenaars, A. A. (1989). A childhood learning disability that predisposes those Af1licted to adolescent and adult depression and suicide risk. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 22, 169-175.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  96. Rutter, M. (1981). Psychological sequelae of brain damage in children. American Journal of Psychiatry, 139, 21-33.Google Scholar
  97. Rutter, M., Chadwick, O., & ShAfler, D. (1983). Head injury. In M. Rutter (Ed.), Developmental neuropsychiatry (pp. 83-111). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  98. Scruggs, T. E., & Wong, B. Y. L. (Eds.). (1990). Intervention research in learning disabilities. Berlin: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  99. Semrud-Clikeman, M. (1995, April). Attention training for children with attentional-hyperactive problems. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco.Google Scholar
  100. Semrud-Clikeman, M., Biederman, J., Sprich-Buckminster, S., Krifcher, B., Lehman, B., Faraone, S. V., et al. (1992). The incidence of ADHD and concurrent learning disabilities. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 31, 439-448.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  101. Semrud-Clikeman, M., & Hynd, G. W. (1991). Specific nonverbal and social skills deficits in children with learning disabilities. In J. E. Obrzut & G. W. Hynd (Eds.), Neuropsychological foundations of learning disabilities: A handbook of issues, methods, and practice (pp. 603-630). Orlando, FL: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  102. Semrud-Clikeman, M., & Hynd, G. W. (1993). Assessment of learning and cognitive dysfunction in young children. In J. L. Culbertson & D. J. Willis (Eds.), Testing young children (pp. 11-28). Austin, TX: PRO-ED.Google Scholar
  103. Semrud-Clikeman, M., Hynd, G. W., Novey, E. S., & Eliopulos, D. (1991). Dyslexia and brain morphology: Relationships between neuroanatomical variation and neurolinguistic tasks. Learning and Individual Differences, 3, 225-242.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  104. Shapiro, E. S. (1989). Academic skills problems: Direct assessment and intervention. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  105. Shapiro, E. S., & Kratochwill, T. R. (1988). Behavioral assessment in schools: Conceptual foundations and practical applications. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  106. Shinn, M. R. (1989). Curriculum-based measurement: Assessing special children. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  107. Smith, A., Walker, M. L., & Myers, G. (1988). Hemispherectomy and diaschisis: Rapid improvement in cerebral functions after right hemispherectomy in a six year old child. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 3, 1-8.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  108. Smith, E., & Alley, G. (1981). The effect of teaching sixth graders with learning disabilities a strategy for solving verbal math problems (Research Report No. 39). Lawrence: University of Kansas, Institute for Research in Learning Disabilities.Google Scholar
  109. Spreen, O., Tupper, D., Risser, A., Tuokko, H., & Edgell, D. (1984). Human developmental neuropsychology. London: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  110. Stanovich, K. E. (1986). Matthew effects in reading: Some consequences of individual differences in the acquisition of literacy. Reading Disability Quarterly, 21, 360-406.Google Scholar
  111. Strang, J. D., & Rourke, B. P. (1985). Adaptive behavior of children with specific arithmetic disabilities and associated neuropsychological abilities and deficits. In B. P. Rourke (Ed.), Neuropsychology of learning disabilities: Essentials of subtype analysis (pp. 302-328). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  112. Teeter, P. A. (1989). Neuropsychological approaches to the remediation of educational deficits. In C. R. Reynolds & E. Fletcher-Janzen (Eds.), Handbook of clinical child neuropsychology (pp. 357-376). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  113. Teeter, P. A. (1992, March). Medical and behavioral paradigms: A false dichotomy. Symposia conducted at the meeting of the National Association of School Psychologists, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  114. Teeter, P. A. (1998). Interventions for children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorders: A developmental perspective. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  115. Teeter Ellison, P. A., & Semrud-Clikeman, M. (1995). Integrating neurobiological, psychosocial, and behavioral paradigms: A transactional model for the study of ADHD. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 10, 433-461.Google Scholar
  116. Teeter Ellison, P. A., & Semrud-Clikeman, M. (2007). Child clinical neuropsychology: Assessment and interventions for neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  117. Tramontana, M., & Hooper, S. (1989). Neuropsychology of child psychopathology. In C. R. Reynolds & E. Fletcher-Janzen (Eds.), Handbook of clinical child neuropsychology (pp. 87-106). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  118. Tunmer, W. E., & Nesdale, A. R. (1985). Phonemic segmentation skill and beginning reading. Journal of Educational Psychology, 77, 417-427.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  119. Tunmer, W. E., & Rohl, M. (1991). Phonological awareness and reading acquisition. In D. Sawyer & B. Fox (Eds.), Phonological awareness in reading: The evolution of current perspectives (pp. 1-30). Berlin: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  120. Vaghn, S., McIntosh, R., & Hogan, A. (1990). Why social skills training doesn't work: An alternative model. In T. E. Scruggs & B. Y. L. Wong (Eds.), Intervention research in learning disabilities (pp. 263-278). Berlin: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  121. Vellutino, F. R., & Scanlon, D. M. (1987). Phonological coding, phonological awareness, and reading ability: Evidence from a longitudinal and experimental study. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 33, 321-363.Google Scholar
  122. Vining, E. P. G., Mellits, D., Dorsen, M. M., Calaldo, M. F., Quarkey, S. A., & Speelberg, S. P., et al. (1987). Psychologic and behavioral effects of antiepileptic drugs in children: A double-blind comparison between phenobarbital and valproic acid. Pediatrics, 80, 165-174.Google Scholar
  123. Virginia Department of Education. (1992). Guidelines for educational services for children with traumatic brain injury. Richmond, VA.Google Scholar
  124. Voeller, K. S. (1986). Right hemisphere deficit syndrome in children. American Journal of Psychiatry, 143, 1004-1011.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  125. Wagner, R. K., & Torgesen, J. K. (1987). The nature of phonological processing and its causal role in the acquisition of reading skills. Psychological Bulletin, 101, 192-212.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  126. Walker, H. M., Holmes, D., Todis, B., & Horton, G. (1988). The Walker Social Skills Curriculum. The ACCESS Program: Adolescent curriculum for communication and effective social skills. Austin, TX: PRO-ED.Google Scholar
  127. Walker, H. M., McConnell, S., Holmes, D., Todis, B., Walker, J., & Golden, N. (1988). The Walker Social Skills Curriculum: The ACCEPTS Program. Austin, TX: PRO-ED.Google Scholar
  128. Weiss, G., & Hechtman, L. (1993). Hyperactive children grown up (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  129. Williams, J. P. (1980). Teaching decoding with an emphasis on phoneme analysis and phoneme blending. Journal of Educational Psychology, 72, 1-15.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  130. Wise, B. W., & Olson, R. K. (1991). Remediating reading disabilities. In J. E. Obrzut & G. W. Hynd (Eds.), Neuropsychological foundations of learning disabilities: A handbook of issues, methods, and practice (pp. 631-658). Orlando, FL: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  131. Wise, B. W., Olson, R. K., Anstett, M., Andrews, L., Terjak, M., Schneider, V., et al. (1989). Implementing a long-term remedial reading study in the public schools: Hardware, software, and real world issues. Behavior Research Methods and Instrumentation, 21, 173-180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  132. Witt, J. C., Elliott, S., & Gresham, F. (1988). Handbook of behavior therapy in education. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  133. Wong, B. Y. L. (Ed.). (1991). Learning about learning disabilities. Orlando, FL: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  134. Yudofsky, S. C., & Hales, R. E. (Eds.). (1992). The American Psychiatric Press textbook of neuropsychiatry (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phyllis Anne Teeter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of Wisconsin-MilwaukeeMilwaukee

Personalised recommendations