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Utilizing a Neuropsychological Paradigm for Understanding Common Educational and Psychological Tests

  • Robert L. Rhodes
  • Rik Carl D’amato
  • Barbara A. Rothlisberg

The field of psychology has long been marked by philosophical diversity and theoretical movements devoted to the investigation of individual differences (D’Amato & Rothlisberg, 1992/1997).

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Practical Implication Receptive Vocabulary Processing Style Behavior Rating Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Rhodes
    • 1
  • Rik Carl D’amato
    • 2
  • Barbara A. Rothlisberg
    • 3
  1. 1.Special Education/Communication Disorders DepartmentNew Mexico State UniversityLas CrucesUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyFaculty of Social Sciences and HumanitiesTaipaChina
  3. 3.Department of Educational PsychologyBall State UniversityMuncieUSA

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