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Intestinal Stomas: Historical Overview

  • James S. Wu
Chapter

Abstract

The word “stoma” is derived from the Greek, stomat, for mouth. Gastrointestinal stomas are artificial connections of the gut to the skin. Reports of colostomies designed to relieve obstruction appear in the eighteenth century. Small intestinal stomas are associated most closely with the twentieth century operations designed to treat inflammatory bowel, urologic, pediatric, and hepatobiliary conditions. Ostomies of the stomach were introduced to decompress the gut or to instill nutrition. This chapter recognizes contributions of pioneers from many disciplines whose work improved the lives of gastrointestinal stoma patients.

Keywords

Ulcerative Colitis Abdominal Wall Artificial Anus Imperforate Anus Sigmoid Flexure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author gratefully acknowledges the following: the Cleveland Clinic Foundation and the Department of Colorectal Surgery for their unreserved support of this work; Mr. Joe Pangrace and the staff of the Cleveland Clinic Department of Art and Photography for their superb illustrations and photographs; the staff of the Cleveland Clinic Library for providing access to the medical literature; Mr. Peter Inglin and Ms. Jill Pinto, H-I Translation Services; Mr. John Holland, The Latin Translator; Major Kenneth M. Koyle, AMEDD office of Medical History; Mr. Earl Ruzen, W.H. Rutzen and son; Mr. Troels Nørgaard Laursen and Mr. Michael C. Davidsen, Coloplast A/S; Mr. Gary Fenton, The Marlen Company; Ms. Punny Donohoe, Mr. George Fattman, Ms. Annette Lee, The ConvaTec Company; Mr. Bradley Galindo and Ms. Estelle Galindo, Nu-Hope Laboratories; Ms. Bobbi Z. Micale and Ms. Diane M. Owen, Hollister International; Mr. Robert W. Turnbull, Vice President, Genairex; Ms. Sally J. Thompson, ET; Mr. Jack B. Chalker, Hon MA., ARCA., RWA., Hon FMAA., RMIP., medical artist and military historian; and Ms. Joyce Balliet and Ms. Marty Hodgson of the Department of Colorectal Surgery, Digestive Disease Institute, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation for their selfless support of this work. Special thanks are expressed to Mr. John B. Small and Mr. Gerard LeTendre of the Taft School, Watertown, Connecticut, who instilled in the author a love of the German and French languages years ago.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Colorectal Surgery, Digestive Disease InstituteCleveland Clinic FoundationClevelandUSA

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